Easing Fatigue and Burnout

What We Eat Matters

Stress and Burnout

January is usually the time of the year people will put wellness goals in place to prevent burnout later in the year. As you prepare your wellness goals for the new year, use these tips to ease fatigue and burnout at home and work.

According to Heartmath,

Generally, the term fatigue refers to physical exhaustion: It can result from a hard day’s work at the construction site or the office, or a strenuous physical workout at school or the gym. Other types such as chronic fatigue and immune dysfunction syndrome require medical attention.

Another form of fatigue that is alarmingly commonplace today is the ongoing fatigue and exhaustion resulting from the wear and tear of everyday life. Millions of people in many of today’s societies have become adapted to the rapid pace of their lives and the weariness that comes from juggling multiple and demanding lifestyles. Knowingly or not, they…

View original post 212 more words

Posted in Stress Management | Leave a comment

The Cost Of Workplace Stress

What We Eat Matters

What people are saying about workplace stress:

  • One-fourth of employees view their jobs as the number one stressor in their lives.-Northwestern National Life
  • Three-fourths of employees believe the worker has more on-the-job stress than a generation ago.-Princeton Survey Research Associates
  • Problems at work are more strongly associated with health complaints than are any other life stressor-more so than even financial problems or family problems.-St. Paul Fire and Marine Innsuance Co.

Job stress can be defined as the harmful physical and emotional responses that occur when the requirements of the job do not match the capabilities, resources, or needs of the worker. Job stress can lead to poor health and even injury.

According to the Center for DIsease Control (CDC) The concept of job stress is often confused with challenge, but these concepts are not the same. Challenge energizes us psychologically and physically, and it motivates us to…

View original post 379 more words

Posted in Stress Management | Leave a comment

Decoding Stress with Food-Magnesium

Epsom Salts help you absorb the magnesium through your skin.

Epsom Salts help you absorb the magnesium through your skin.

Leafy Green

Leafy Greens

#‎thestressplate‬ The stress plate is a weekly series that will focus on foods to help combat ‪#‎stress‬. When stressed remember to increase your Magnesium by adding leafy greens to your plate or adding espsom salts to your bath ritual. Magnesium helps to fight stress induced fatigue.

Posted in Stress Management | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Decoding Stress with Food- The Avocado

avocado-cut-in-half

I am starting a weekly series called #‎thestressplate‬ The stress plate is a weekly series that will focus on foods to help combat ‪#‎stress‬. When stressed remember to add an avocado to your daily intake. Avocados are loaded with potassium, a vital mineral for keeping blood pressure low.

Another great stress management technique is quick coherence from HeartMath:

Step 1: Heart Focus. Focus your attention on the area around your heart, the area in the center of your chest. If you prefer, the first couple of times you try it, place your hand over the center of your chest to help keep your attention in the heart area.

Step 2: Heart Breathing. Breathe deeply, but normally, and imagine that your breath is coming in and going out through your heart area. Continue breathing with ease until you find a natural inner rhythm that feels good to you.

Step 3: Heart Feeling. As you maintain your heart focus and heart breathing, activate a positive feeling. Recall a positive feeling, a time when you felt good inside, and try to re-experience the feeling. One of the easiest ways to generate a positive, heart-based feeling is to remember a special place you’ve been to or the love you feel for a close friend or family member or treasured pet. This is the most important step.

Posted in Stress Management | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Does Stress Interfere with Learning?

stress zones inverted U

Recently, I started a quest to find out how stress interferes with learning and if it does interfere with learning. We’ll that journey lead me into the world of neuroplasticity (changes in neural pathways and synapses due to changes in behavior, environment, emotions, and thinking. From there I became training in systems that helps the brain get prepared for learning, when lower and midbrain development is incomplete. So that is why I have not blogged in a while. I have been playing around in the world of neuro-pathways.

Let’s look at the question, does stress interfere with learning?

In the article, The Powerful Impact of Stress V. Tennant talks about stress and learning and using positive emotions to combat stress.  In it she states, It’s normal to have a touch of apprehension and butterflies in the stomach before a test or perhaps a big meeting. This is the positive side of the stress curve that enhances performance. However, when the anxiety gets out of control and cross to the other side of the curve, performance plummets. The key is to keep everything balanced. When you or in this case students start to not manage stress effectively, it is time to look at strategies that help with stress management.
I teach my clients all emotions come from their core…or gut and that every emotional response will trigger a reminder to them that is either painful or pleasurable. Positive emotions not only help with stress management, but also helps with  concentrate, solve problems, creativity, learning, and memory.Researchers at the HeartMath Institute found that positive emotions such as feelings of love, appreciation, peacefulness, and playfulness produce an even heartbeat rhythm(coherence). A coherent heart is a less stressful heart. Here are tips on creating you own heart coherence.

Step 1. Take a time-out, breathe slowly and deeply. Imagine the air entering and leavingthrough the heart area or the center of your chest.

Step 2. Try to disengage from your stressful thoughts and feelings as you continue to breathe.

Step 3. Continue until you have neutralized the emotional charge around the issue, by thinking of something positive.

Posted in Emotional Resilience, Stress Management, Workplace Stress | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Cost Of Workplace Stress

What people are saying about workplace stress:

  • One-fourth of employees view their jobs as the number one stressor in their lives.-Northwestern National Life
  • Three-fourths of employees believe the worker has more on-the-job stress than a generation ago.-Princeton Survey Research Associates
  • Problems at work are more strongly associated with health complaints than are any other life stressor-more so than even financial problems or family problems.-St. Paul Fire and Marine Innsuance Co.

Job stress can be defined as the harmful physical and emotional responses that occur when the requirements of the job do not match the capabilities, resources, or needs of the worker. Job stress can lead to poor health and even injury.

According to the Center for DIsease Control (CDC) The concept of job stress is often confused with challenge, but these concepts are not the same. Challenge energizes us psychologically and physically, and it motivates us to learn new skills and master our jobs. When a challenge is met, we feel relaxed and satisfied. Thus, challenge is an important ingredient for healthy and productive work. The importance of challenge in our work lives is probably what people are referring to when they say “a little bit of stress is good for you.

Some employers assume that stressful working conditions are a necessary evil-that companies must turn up the pressure on workers and set aside health concerns to remain productive and profitable in today’s economy. But research findings challenge this belief. Studies show that stressful working conditions are actually associated with increased absenteeism, tardiness, and intentions by workers to quit their jobs-all of which have a negative effect on the bottom line.

What we have learned about stress is that it can impact all areas of an employees life:

What the Research Tells Us

Cardiovascular Disease
Many studies suggest that psychologically demanding jobs that allow employees little control over the work process increase the risk of cardiovascular disease.

Musculoskeletal Disorders
On the basis of research by NIOSH and many other organizations, it is widely believed that job stress increases the risk for development of back and upper- extremity musculoskeletal disorders.

Psychological Disorders
Several studies suggest that differences in rates of mental health problems (such as depression and burnout) for various occupations are due partly to differences in job stress levels. (Economic and lifestyle differences between occupations may also contribute to some of these problems.)

Workplace Injury
Although more study is needed, there is a growing concern that stressful working conditions interfere with safe work practices and set the stage for injuries at work.

Suicide, Cancer, Ulcers, and Impaired Immune Function
Some studies suggest a relationship between stressful working conditions and these health problems. However, more research is needed before firm conclusions can be drawn.

If you are experiencing stress, these three steps can help:

St e p 1. Take a time-out, breathe slowly and deeply. Imagine the air entering and leaving

through the heart area or the center of your chest.

St e p 2. Try to disengage from your stressful thoughts and feelings as you continue to breathe.

St e p 3. Continue until you have neutralized the emotional charge around the issue

Posted in Job Stress, Office Stress, Stress Management, Work Stress | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Easing Fatigue and Burnout

Stress and Burnout

January is usually the time of the year people will put wellness goals in place to prevent burnout later in the year. As you prepare your wellness goals for the new year, use these tips to ease fatigue and burnout at home and work.

According to Heartmath,

Generally, the term fatigue refers to physical exhaustion: It can result from a hard day’s work at the construction site or the office, or a strenuous physical workout at school or the gym. Other types such as chronic fatigue and immune dysfunction syndrome require medical attention.

Another form of fatigue that is alarmingly commonplace today is the ongoing fatigue and exhaustion resulting from the wear and tear of everyday life. Millions of people in many of today’s societies have become adapted to the rapid pace of their lives and the weariness that comes from juggling multiple and demanding lifestyles. Knowingly or not, they suffer from a fatigue that won’t subside.
Closely related is burnout, which also is marked by long-term exhaustion and is further defined by Webster’s New World Dictionary as “a state of emotional exhaustion caused by the stresses of one’s work or responsibilities.”

Tips for easing fatigue and burnout:

Step 1: Heart Focus. Focus your attention on the area around your heart, the area in the center of your chest. If you prefer, the first couple of times you try it, place your hand over the center of your chest to help keep your attention in the heart area.

Step 2: Heart Breathing. Breathe deeply, but normally, and imagine that your breath is coming in and going out through your heart area. Continue breathing with ease until you find a natural inner rhythm that feels good to you.

Step 3: Heart Feeling. As you maintain your heart focus and heart breathing, activate a positive feeling. Recall a positive feeling, a time when you felt good inside, and try to re-experience the feeling. One of the easiest ways to generate a positive, heart-based feeling is to remember a special place you’ve been to or the love you feel for a close friend or family member or treasured pet. This is the most important step.

Posted in Stress Management | Tagged , , , | 1 Comment